There Are No Words


Yesterday I learned of the death of twenty-seven-year-old Jona Kay who died in a car accident on May 7th. Jona is the granddaughter of Butch and Bonnie Dean, fellow bloggers and lovely people.

In their own words “There Are No Words” to describe the pain and anguish this family is suffering.

No, there are no words, but each of us can find words of prayer for God’s peace and comfort for Bonnie and Butch and all of Jona’s family.

Thank you for helping to ease their pain.

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What is Love?


Recently a fellow blogger posted a beautiful poem asking the question “What is Love?”.

Today I am attending the wedding of two people who have found love once again in their lives; the bride is eighty years young and the groom ninety-one. In 2014 I wrote this poem, “What is Love?” Happy weekend.

WHAT IS LOVE

What is love

if not the closeness

of every experience

…sharing.

What is love

if not the oneness

of two people

…caring.

What is love

if not the expression

of honest emotion

…feelings.

What is love

if not understanding

the wholeness

…of all of these.

©2014

 

 

 

 

What Are We Worth?


“I can barely tolerate my parents, now.” This from a middle aged woman I met in a supermarket not long ago. I was reaching for an item on a top shelf and she, being much taller, retrieved it for me. She asked if there was anything else I needed. The woman then guided me to the next item I had trouble finding.

“You are a geriatric person. I can tell,” I commented.

“Not really,” she said. And that was when she offered the opening comment, “I can barely tolerate my parents, now.They are in their eighties and showing their age.”

Yesterday, I read a post by Roger Baker, “The Worth of a Man”. It’s a tribute to a man celebrating his eightieth birthday and how some people have shunted him to the back burner of their lives.  https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/24904117

And to those people he wrote a poem where one line stood out for me. “You spurn the soul what made you.”

“You spurn the soul what made you.” There is so much truth in that tiny sentence, as proven by the woman in the supermarket.

Some of us in this age bracket are noticing this phenomenon and wondering…what are we worth?

Do not cast me away when I am old; do not forsake me when my strength is gone. Psalm 71:9 NIV

 

She’s Doing Just Fine


Today’s posts are from two inspirational people in the blogging world, Bonnie and Butch Dean. Enjoy.

Wordsmith's Desk

~~~

She asks too little and labors too long, but I can’t help thinking…

in the eyes of God, she’s doing just fine.

~

Her hospice background and the loss of a son enable her to talk with others about this death and dying that we so often fear. She holds others in her heart, talks to them on the phone, crying with them as they share their grieving heart and somehow, helps them to cope.

She is the last of her family for her brothers and parents are all gone. She has her mountain of grief, yet reaches out to others to share their grief with her…she listens, she understands. She offers an understanding heart and a memory bear to hold and hug as they remember, through their tears, their loved one.

Maybe, she asks too little and labors too long, but I can’t help thinking…

in the eyes…

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Creating Memories – Part Two


Yesterday I re-blogged a post, “Creating Memories” by Butch Dean. Today I want to re-emphasize some of the points Butch made because they are really memorable.

“Death has taken someone from our lives. The memories are as good as they’re going to get and there will be no more.”Read that last sentence again: “The memories are as good as they’re going to get and there will be no more.” How profound!

Butch also wrote, “We live with what we created…..we regret the rest of our life, a memory we could have changed, but didn’t.” I find this very insightful and worth thinking about, but more so, putting into practice.

“Focus on creating good memories…” Well, we don’t always do that, and why should we? The answer is in the first paragraph of Butch’s blog. “More often than not, we don’t see it until it’s too late; a memory that you’d just as soon forget has been made.”

Today’s post is perpetuated for a purpose and that is to be more aware of how we are living our lives. Are we making memories that will be a blessing to ourselves and others or are we making memories we would just as soon forget?

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the Cue


Day fifteen of the #everydayinspiration challenge suggested taking a cue from your reader for this blog. The reader I chose is arwen1968 who, in response to my June 30th blog, “To Write or Not to Wrie”  suggested many things to write about including books. I chose books by one author in particular…Frederick Beuchner…mainly because of one of his quotes: “You can kiss your family and friends good-bye and put miles between you, but at the same time you carry them with you in your heart, your mind, your stomach, because you do not just live in a world but a world lives in you.”

Another reason I chose this author was due to a Facebook comment that took exception to another of his quotes, surely due to misinterpretation.

I have posted about Frederick Beuchner once before, with good response, and a few questions about the man, so included in this blog is a bit from Wikipedia:

Carl Frederick Buechner (born July 11, 1926) is an American writer and theologian. He is an ordained Presbyterian minister and the author of more than thirty published books.[1] His work encompasses different genres, including fiction, autobiography, essays and sermons, and his career has spanned six decades. Buechner’s books have been translated into many languages for publication around the world. He is best known for his works A Long Day’s Dying (his first work, published in 1950); The Book of Bebb, a tetralogy based on the character Leo Bebb published in 1979;Godric, a first person narrative of the life of the medieval saint, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1981; Brendan, a second novel narrating a saint’s life, published in 1987; Listening to Your Life: Daily Meditations with Frederick Buechner (1992); and his autobiographical works The Sacred Journey (1982), Now and Then (1983), Telling Secrets (1991), and The Eyes of the Heart: Memoirs of the Lost and Found (1999). He has been called “Major talent” and “…a very good writer indeed” by the New York Times, and “one of our most original storytellers” by USA Today.Annie Dillard (Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Pilgrim at Tinker Creek) says: “Frederick Buechner is one of our finest writers.” [2]

Buechner’s work has often been praised for its ability to inspire readers to see the grace in their daily lives. As stated in the London Free Press, “He is one of our great novelists because he is one of our finest religious writers.”[3] He has been a finalist for the National Book Award[4]Presented by the National Book Foundation and the Pulitzer Prize,[5] and has been awarded eight honorary degrees from such institutions asYale University[6] and the Virginia Theological Seminary.[7] In addition, Buechner has been the recipient of the O. Henry Award,[8] the Rosenthal Award, the Christianity and Literature Belles Lettres Prize, and has been recognized by the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.[9]He is continually listed among the most read authors by Christian audiences.[citation needed

To you, arwen1968, I say, “Thanks for the cue.”

 

 

Apologizing


Today I’m going to reblog one part of a blog by Osarobohenry, just in case there are some who don’t follow him. I found this quite profound:

“Apologizing does not always mean that you’re wrong and the other person is right. It just means that you value your relationship more than your ego.”

Tomorrow I’m going to borrow from another blogger I just met. These people put up some great posts.