Sharing


The best part of caring is sharing. Here is one of my great-granddaughters sharing a cookie with me on a recent visit. What makes this picture so special is that I had done the same thing with her mother with a french fry thirty-six years ago. Do your share of sharing today. Happy Saturday.

image1.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paying It Forward


Today’s post is a follow-up to A Goal of Love posted on Saturday, March 2nd which was about a hockey player taking time out of his day to be kind to a young fan. The goaltender was more than kind; he epitomized everything in this  banner.

How often does something wonderful happen to us and we think we should pay it forward but something blocks our action to follow through. Perhaps we need reminding of this simple little gesture of good will by keeping these words at the forefront of our lives.

No matter what, buy the person behind you in the drive through, the person next to you at lunch, smile and hi to a perfect stranger. If you have ever been done for some one or had someone do it for you, you know it's most amazing feeling.

 

 

up

Our Perception of Life


A friend shared this with me last Saturday morning because I had used the words, I can see clearly now as the finishing touch on a post,  The Plank In My Eye on March 9th. I have always loved the song.  The following is indeed another life lesson in itself, again taken from the song, I Can See Clearly Now written by Johnny Nash in 1972.

Do you know who Johnny Nash is? In my opinion, he is a genius who provided a tremendous life lesson hidden in the lyrics of a great song. If you investigate the meaning behind the message, you’ll discover the impact of his words.

Have you ever realized that your perception of life is the lens through which you view your life? Our perception truly shapes our reality. Is your lens clear, and do you like what you see? Or have you allowed circumstances in your life to cloud up your lens and change your viewpoint and perspective?

“I can see clearly now the rain is gone.”

I love this lyric. Here is a person who has cleaned his lens. The rain was blocking his vision of life. When the “hard rain” is pouring down all around, it’s easy to miss the beauty around you, the opportunities open to you.

“I can see all obstacles in my way.”

This person has arrived at a moment of clarity. Now that the rain is gone, he can finally see the obstacles preventing him from the goals and dreams he has been pursuing without success. Once you define and acknowledge your obstacles, you can create a compelling plan of action to turn these obstacles into tangible opportunities.

“Gone are the dark clouds that had me blind.”

Wow, this is such a powerful use of words! We have all experienced “dark cloud” moments in our life. We have been hurt and disappointed. We have experienced losses and unexpected moments of sadness. We have been this close to a major victory only to fall short and have to start over. To me, these powerful words represent a message of hope. The dark clouds in our life will disappear. We will maintain our faith and belief that things can and will work out in the end.

“It’s going to be a bright bright sunshiny day”

Beautiful optimism! What an inspiring and positive outlook this lyric projects. This person has cleared off the lens, recognized the obstacles, removed the dark clouds, and replaced his blindness with a powerful vision. The road ahead is bathed in bright sunshine.

Johnny Nash’s words are open to interpretation, but I believe the rain could have been a series of negative emotions. The obstacles could have been the source of that (rain) pain. The dark clouds could have been the acceptance of those negative emotions causing blindness to the possibilities. The bright sunshiny day could be the moment the person said, “No more! From today forward, I will take hold of my life and choose to look through my lens with the hope, faith, and confidence that a bright future brings.”

Clear your lens and embrace your future – every day. What song has a lot of meaning to you?

Make A Difference Today,
~Paul

How to Say We Care


Today’s blog is inspired by Pastor Duncan’s sermon last Sunday. He talked about how we tell someone we love them with the gift we give. He then went on to some of the ways we say we care, and I have added to them…

The gift is thoughtful

Preparing a favorite food

A warm, meaningful hug

A telephone call

A surprise visit

Sharing a life event

A helping hand in time of need

A hand written note

There are so many more ways to say we care…

 

 

Stand By Me


On Thursday I attended another end-of-life celebration. A dear friend in her 95th year had been declining for a few years after breaking a hip which never completely healed. This robbed her of her active life and eventually landed her into a long-term-care facility where each year she longed to be closer to her Maker.

Not long ago as I entered her room for a visit she called out, “Oh, Pat. I’m still here and I don’t know what to do.” “Well, Carol,” I replied, “there is a long line of people waiting at the gates of Heaven and you will just have to be patient and wait your turn.”

Carol had been very active in our church and community for over sixty years and as one of our elders, cared deeply for those in her care. She, too, had been a comforting visitor to many people and had seen many of her friends climb that stairway to heaven.

I had the opportunity and pleasure of meeting her two sons and daughter on many occasions while visiting Carol. Their love for their mother was very evident in the way they each attended to her needs at various times. There was affection, gentle chiding, wholesome conversation and endless hours of just being with her. They were always standing by her side.

Yesterday I heard that wonderful song, “Stand by Me” and it brought tears to my eyes as Carol and her devoted family came into my mind.

Don’t we all need somebody to Stand by Me? Enjoy this rendition from many parts of our world and have a Happy Saturday.

Condolences to Congratulations


It was my privilege once again to attend funerals for two members of my church, St. Andrew’s Presbyterian, Scarborough. One took place on Saturday, April 22nd and the other on Monday, April 24th. The only significant difference in the lives of these two people, besides their gender, was their age. Alfred was in his 102nd year and Debra had just turned sixty.

The love, admiration, and accolades directed to these two wonderful people by their friends and families left the rest of us wishing we had known them better while at the same time conveying the feeling that we knew them well.

Debra had been an operating room nurse, well known for her caring ways, sunny smile and warm hugs. She was also known for her tenacity in dealing with health problems, and for continuing to love unconditionally in the face of all adversity.

Alfred, had been active all of his life and even at the age of one-hundred-and-one, was still doing aerobics, walking, and standing tall and straight. Our Pastor remarked that when Alfred walked down the aisle to his familiar pew, everyone else automatically straightened their posture.

As end-of-life celebrations can be, these two were so inspirational that one could not help but offer congratulations along with condolences to the loved ones left behind; congratulations for having shared in the lives of these two remarkable people.

Condolences to congratulations…it was so fitting to offer both.

 

In the Moment


Living consciously involves being genuine; it involves listening and responding to others honestly and openly; it involves being in the moment.”  So says Sidney Poitier in his book, The Measure of a Man.

What does it mean to be genuine; to listen and respond to others honestly and openly; to be in the moment?

It is enough to just ponder these words and glean something from them. It is more than enough to act upon them. There are people waiting to be heard, to have their concerns responded to honestly and openly, to know that someone is in their moment.

Living consciously is being aware; not just going through the motions of day-to-day life. Living consciously is also a responsibility, not only to ourselves but to those who inhabit our world, both our own little world and the world at large. By living consciously we can make a difference in someone else’s life. Maybe we should take a page from Sidney Poitier’s book and take a moment to be in the moment.