See the Spirit Within (Namaste)


Recognizing God’s Spirit in each other would be a wonderful way of looking beyond appearances and seeing our unity.

“I will put My Spirit within you…” Ezekiel 36:27

“The Spirit within me salutes the Spirit in you”. This is one of the meanings for the word Namaste, an ancient Sanskrit greeting.

Here is one of my great-granddaughters (four years young in this photo) in the Namaste pose which she enjoys very much. Happy Sunday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Rainbow Apology


It is evening time on August 13th and I am looking at a beautiful rainbow as I write this. It reminds me of a time when I gave a book of children’s Bible stories to a little girl many years ago.

The child saw the story of Noah’s Ark and the accompanying picture of people, including children, drowning in the great flood of Genesis 7. This story had a devastating effect on the little girl and I’m sure turned her mind totally away from anything to do with God.

Unfortunately, the story was never satisfactorily explained to her nor the meaning of the rainbow that followed in Genesis 9:13, I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth. 

This was God’s promise to Noah, and all of us, that He would never again do such a destructive thing to His people.

I’ve never been sure whether the flood story is allegory or not, but one thing I am sure of is that it’s effect on one little girl has haunted me since the day I was made aware of her great fear and apprehension.

Just as the rainbow of thousands of years ago was meant to be an apology from God to His people, this evening’s rainbow reminds me that because of a cruelly depicted story, a young child may have grown up to be an unbeliever…and for this I am truly sorry.

I pray that there has been enough evidence over the years of a God who loves her unconditionally and will continue to do so for the rest of her life.

This is my rainbow apology to that little girl.

Rainbow over a small sunlit island, Masuria district, Poland Stock Photo - 16198246

 

Does God Have a Sense of Humor?


All life lessons should include laughter so here are a few funnies that have come my way over the years.

GOOD SAMARITAN – A Sunday School teacher was telling her class the story of the Good Samaritan. She asked the class, “If you saw a person lying on the side of the road wounded and bleeding what would you do?” A thoughtful little girl broke the silence with, “I think I’d throw up.”

DID NOAH FISH? – A Sunday School teacher asked, “Johnny, do you think Noah did a lot of fishing when he was on the Ark?” “No,” replied Johnny, “How could he with just two worms.”

THE LORD IS MY SHEPHERD – A Sunday School teacher asked her young class to memorize one of the most quoted passages of the Bible, Psalm 23. She gave the youngsters a month to learn the chapter. One boy couldn’t get past the first line even after much practice. On the day to recite the Psalm in front of the congregation Ricky was so nervous he stepped up to the microphone and said, “The Lord is my shepherd and that’s all I need to know.”

UNANSWERED PRAYER – The preacher’s five-year-old daughter asked her dad why he always bowed his head for a moment before starting his sermon. “Well, Honey,” he explained, “I”m praying to the Lord to help me to preach a good sermon.” “How come He doesn’t answer?” she asked.

TO PRAY OR NOT TO PRAY – Sunday dinner was at Grandmother’s house and after everyone was served, little Johnny began to eat his meal at once. “Johnny, please wait until we say our prayer,” said his mother. “I don’t need to,” the boy replied.” “You know we always say a prayer at our house,” his mother reminded him. “That’s at our house,” Johnny explained. “But this is Grandma’s house and she knows how to cook.”

SAYING A PRAYER – While praying over a person who was suffering gas pain, I closed the prayer with, “And, Lord, help him to remember that this too shall pass.”

Does God have a sense of humor? I hope so.

On Lowering Expectations


These two words have preyed upon my thoughts lately and I’ve been weighing the pros and cons.

It is said that lowering one’s expectations leads to more happiness and compassion. But for whom? For the one whose expectations are lowered or the one who does not live up to someone’s expectations…or even their own? One online expert said, “We’re happier to accept other people’s difficult behaviors when we expect less from them.” Hmmm, I’m not so sure.

What actually is an expectation? One dictionary’s interpretation is a strong belief that something will happen or be the case in the future. For me it was adding the word wonderful to that something.

I have lived my life with this premise and nearly always had my expectations met, making it difficult to lower my expectations of anything or anyone. It would be like giving up hope.

The pros for lessening expectations seem to dictate that if you don’t expect the best from people or life you won’t be disappointed when the best fails to materialize.

On the other hand, the cons, at least for me, would be giving in to the feeling of apathy that accompanies losing hope and I can’t do that.

In many cases in my life, it was someone else’s high expectation of me that brought me through eighty-one years of fairly successful living.

When we were children, we expected our parents would always be there for us; we expected hugs when we needed them and scoldings when they were needed as well. We expected to be fed, clothed, counseled, nurtured, and sent out into the world to in turn, one day expect to do these things for others. As life goes on expectations change…not because they are lowered, but perhaps because we fail to see what is expected of us.

So, I think instead of lowering my expectations I will instead extend the time frame of what I expect to when I expect it.

That way I still have hope.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Much is Too Much?


My attention has been drawn back to the year 2007 when I was in a hospital emergency room experiencing heart attack symptoms. While there I met an eighty-four old grandmother who confided in me that it didn’t matter if she lived or died at this point in her life. As she poured out her sorrows to me my heart broke even more.

This wonderful woman had lost two adult children…one to cancer and the other in a car accident. If that wasn’t bad enough one of her grandchildren, at eighteen months, had died of meningitis.

I believe we met at that particular time because I needed her strength and courage to lean on. I had had lung cancer surgery two years prior to this heart episode, and my husband, now in the final stages of Alzheimer’s disease, was dying.

How much is too much? Only God knows.