The Sound of Silence


When we hear the sound of silence it is imperative to stop and listen. It comes in the form of stillness. It comes to everyone at one time or another; the key is to be aware and allow it to unfold.

Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together; that at length they may emerge, full-formed and majestic, into the delight of life, which they are thenceforth to rule.  Thomas Carlyle

Mother Theresa said: “The most important thing is silence. We cannot place ourselves directly in God’s presence without imposing upon ourselves interior and exterior silence.”

And Simon and Garfunkel had this to say about the Sound of Silence. Happy Saturday.

A Precious Gift


Our choir director, Pascal Kalumbi, is a very gifted pianist. He has given me permission to share this and I do so for all who love music, piano, and the beauty of a precious gift. Enjoy…and I know you will. Happy Saturday.

Favorite Songs


One of my many favorite songs is Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah. One of my favorite performers of this song is k.d. lang.  She performs Hallelujah with such feeling, the audience appreciation is palpable.  Note the passion she puts into her performance, especially at the end. The song took Cohen two years to write and was released in 1984. Happy Saturday.

Life’s Angels


To follow up on last Wednesday’s blog, I found another angel song that touched me; and also another scripture about angels. I’m so happy to find my angels again. Happy Saturday.

Then I looked and heard the voice of many angels, numbering thousands upon thousands, and ten thousand times ten thousand. Revelation 5:11

Born Free


Do you ever feel that you are a slave to a life of busyness, illness, pain, commercialism…all the things that prevent us from enjoying the life we were meant to live? Sometimes just hearing a lovely peace of music can remind us that through it all we were born free and one day we will be free again.

 

 

Power Forever


We have had a series of sermons on the Lord’s Prayer for the past few Sundays and it has been a wonderful learning experience to actually embrace the meaning of each sentence of that powerful prayer. I’m looking forward to, “For Yours is the Kingdom, the POWER, and the Glory, Forever. Amen.” Happy Sunday.

 

Love Knows No Bounds


You wouldn’t think one could write about feeling love just by attending a concert. But I can.

I attended a St. Patrick’s concert on Saturday night and what I saw and heard touched my heart and soul with love.

Two sisters performed Scottish (Scottish not Irish) dancing while their mother explained the origin of the dances. Their younger sister sang to the accompanying guitar of their dad. The only boy in the family was a very helpful stage hand. It was truly a family affair.

There was a violin duet, a bell choir, a harpist, an Electronic Bagpipes player, and a trio of gents who were brilliant in both song and instruments.

A beautiful rendition of “Lots of Ireland in My Soul” was sung by a lady in memory of her husband who had composed both music and words. Two other soloists filled the hall with lovely song, as well.

At the last minute, one of the performers couldn’t make it and the MC stepped in on short notice with a beautiful rendition of “Danny Boy”. He also did a comic take on “Memories” which had the audience laughing.

There was a husband and wife team who moved us all with “It Is Well With My Soul”; he played the piano while his wife played a steel drum and beautifully sang the hymn. And then there was the same young man’s astounding piano performance which had the audience on their feet at the final chord.

My heart was full of love the whole evening and I’ll tell you why. All of these marvelous performers are members and/or adherents of our church; attendees, employees, volunteers, choir members…wonderful people.

And that’s what I mean by love knows no bounds.

 

The Seekers Revisited


This post heralds another song by The Seekers, the group I posted about yesterday. Among many of their great hits is “Kumbaya” described in Wikipedia as follow:

“Kum ba yah (“Come by Here”) is a spiritual song first recorded in the 1920s. It became a standard campfire song in scouting and summer camps and enjoyed broader popularity during the folk revival of the 1950s and 1960s. The song was originally a simple appeal to God to come and help those in need.”  Happy Sunday.