Saint So and So


Last Sunday’s sermon, “The Feast of Saint Jim”, was very inspiring. We learned that as believers, we are all “saints”.

I don’t know about you but I sure don’t feel very saintly; however I do know people who truly deserve that title.

These are people who give of themselves, their time, resources, energy, and never seem to tire of being saintly, although I’m positive that they don’t see themselves as saints.

It was an excellent sermon, “The Feast of Saint Jim”, and offered much food for thought.

If you are wondering who Saint Jim is, just substitute your own name or the names of people you know who not only believe but act on their beliefs. Go ahead…name a few saints you are acquainted with and the next time you are in their company be sure to say, “Hello, Saint So and So.”

 

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The Time Has Come


Many years ago I wrote the following piece and turned it into a poem called, Metanoia For the Modern World. It was first posted in 2014.

Are we praying for ways to redeem the world or planning ways to destruct it?

Remember Saul on the road to Damascus.  God stopped him in his tracks on that hot, dusty road and struck him first with blindness and then with metanoia, a change of heart.

Saul the persecutor became Paul the saint.

God can do that in today’s world too.

World leaders need to do some soul-searching as did Saul. Are they  interested in peace or is power their real agenda?

If it is a power struggle, God, as he did with Saul, will have the final say.

The world is getting a wake-up call.

Perhaps the energy spent on threats would pay better dividends if used for promoting peace.

Who is perceived to be the most powerful?  Let them put that power to use constructively rather than destructively.

God can change the hearts of ordinary people also.

Let us each leave our own little world, the world of personal, pithy, private life and step into the big picture.

Let us all step onto the road to our own Damascus and experience metanoia.

The time has come.

I Love Spending Time With You


I know a lady whose husband often spoke those words to her, “I love spending time with you.”

It made me think of how God longs to hear those words from us.

Can we bring ourselves to not only say those words to Him and mean them, but also spend some time with Him every day? Happy Sunday.

Isaiah 30:18 New Living Translation (NLT)

Blessings for the Lord’s People

18 So the Lord must wait for you to come to him
    so he can show you his love and compassion.
For the Lord is a faithful God.
    Blessed are those who wait for his help.

 

 

What’s in an Hour?


So many of us have mixed feelings about the time change taking place at two a.m. Sunday morning. “Oh, no! I lose an hour of sleep!” But to me that extra hour of daylight is well worth the loss of sleep. It heralds the start of those long and lovely days of summer after a long and snow-filled winter. Bring it on! Happy Saturday.

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This Moment in Time


Stop! Right now, stop what you are doing and be still if only for just a few seconds…give in to the stillness.

In spite of any chaos around you or in you, give in to being still for this moment in time. Try to make this a habit, and eventually, at any time of the day or night while in the moment, a thought will occur about your life, the world, a problem; anything that has been robbing you of peace and serenity, and the brief respite will infuse you with hope, insight, and a new perspective.

Whenever possible, be silent and listen. Notice how these two words use the exact same letters to fulfill each other…be silent and listen.

In this moment in time hear what God says in Psalm 46:10 Be still and know that I am God.

For now, carry on…the rest of your day is waiting to be lived.

 

 

 

The In Between


The following is a poem by Linda Ellis and contains her copyright at the end of it. It is a lovely poem about life and death and everything in between.

The Dash
by Linda Ellis
 
I read of a man who stood to speak
At the funeral of a friend
 
He referred to the dates on her tombstone
From the beginning to the end
 
He noted that first came her date of her birth
And spoke the following date with tears,
 
But he said what mattered most of all
Was the dash between those years
 
For that dash represents all the time
That she spent alive on earth.
 
And now only those who loved her
Know what that little line is worth.
 
For it matters not how much we own;
The cars, the house, the cash,
 
What matters is how we live and love
And how we spend our dash.
 
So think about this long and hard.
Are there things you’d like to change?
 
For you never know how much time is left,
That can still be rearranged.
 
If we could just slow down enough
To consider what’s true and real
 
And always try to understand
The way other people feel.
 
And be less quick to anger,
And show appreciation more
 
And love the people in our lives
Like we’ve never loved before.
 
If we treat each other with respect,
And more often wear a smile
 
Remembering that this special dash
Might only last a little while.
 
So, when your eulogy is being read
With your life’s actions to rehash
 
Would you be proud of the things they say
About how you spent your dash?
 
© 1996 All Rights Reserved, Linda Ellis
 This entry was posted on Friday, July 28th, 2006
My reason for sharing this poem today is for the many people in my life sphere who are grieving the loss of a loved one…a daughter, a sister, a husband, a wife. May it also serve as a reminder that those we love have a dash as do we ourselves. May this lovely poem be the blessing that I’m sure it’s author meant it to be.

Time Marches On


Time is an intriguing subject, don’t you think? It is always with us to do with as we will…fill it, spend it, waste it, look at it forwards and backwards, but capture it? Uh-uh. It is so fleeting that the second you try to live in the moment, the moment is gone. But live in it anyway…it is a great way of learning to become more aware.

Have you ever thought about how much time it takes to walk down memory lane? Or how long it took Perry Como to record the song, Till the End of Time in 1945?

And what about the songs written about clocks: My Grandfather’s Clock that ticked away it’s owner’s life from the day that he was born until the day that he died…ninety years. And The Syncopated Clock written by Leroy Anderson in 1945; a fun and lively piece of music.

Time is spoken about throughout the Bible, but the best time passage (pun intended) is Ecclesiastes 3:1-8. It is good reading to be sure and a wise use of words by King Solomon.

Time can be fleeting, or hang heavy on your hands, but it does not stand still…no matter what…time marches on.